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wipaed:10_thesen [2008/04/09 12:23]
hartmut
wipaed:10_thesen [2008/04/09 12:26] (aktuell)
hartmut
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 When Amazon.com sells more items that aren't carried in retail stores than are, it's pretty apparent that an era of specialized production is made possible by the Internet. Chris Anderson'​s book should capture the attention of the educational world as the technologies of the Web make "​differentiated instruction"​ a reality that both parents and students will demand. I can go online and watch heart-surgery take place live. I can find a tutor in almost any subject who can work with me via video-conference and shared desktop. If a student cares about something--if they have a passion for something--they can learn about it and they can actually produce work in the field and become a contributing part of that community. When Amazon.com sells more items that aren't carried in retail stores than are, it's pretty apparent that an era of specialized production is made possible by the Internet. Chris Anderson'​s book should capture the attention of the educational world as the technologies of the Web make "​differentiated instruction"​ a reality that both parents and students will demand. I can go online and watch heart-surgery take place live. I can find a tutor in almost any subject who can work with me via video-conference and shared desktop. If a student cares about something--if they have a passion for something--they can learn about it and they can actually produce work in the field and become a contributing part of that community.
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 Web 2.0 was amazing when blogs and wikis led the way to user-created content, but the party really began when sites that combined several Web 2.0 tools together created the phenomenon of "​social networking."​ If MySpace were a country, it would be the third most populous in the world. What Ning is doing by allowing users to create their own social networks is amazing. The potential for education is astounding. Web 2.0 was amazing when blogs and wikis led the way to user-created content, but the party really began when sites that combined several Web 2.0 tools together created the phenomenon of "​social networking."​ If MySpace were a country, it would be the third most populous in the world. What Ning is doing by allowing users to create their own social networks is amazing. The potential for education is astounding.
  
-The shifts and where we're going in a larger context. The implications for education and learning are paradigm-shattering,​ as they in fact are all really about education and learning. +[[The shifts and where we're going in a larger context]]
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-* From consuming to producing +
-* From authority to transparency +
-* From the expert to the facilitator +
-* From the lecture to the hallway +
-* From "​access to information"​ to "​access to people"​ +
-* From "​learning about" to "​learning to be" +
-* From passive to passionate learning +
-* From presentation to participation +
-* From publication to conversation +
-* From formal schooling to lifelong learning +
-* From supply-push to demand-pull +
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-Some things educators can do if there is truth to the above: +
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-* Learn About Web 2.0. It's not going to go away, and it is pretty amazing. It may seem overwhelming,​ but it's worth taking the time to jump in somewhere and start the process. Classroom 2.0 (www.Classroom20.com) is not a bad place to start, since it's a social network for educators who are interested in learning about Web 2.0, as it turns out... :) I do like social networking as an easy way to enter the world of Web 2.0, and a good list of educational social networks can be found at http://​socialnetworksined.wikispaces.com. +
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-* Lurk. There is nothing wrong with "​lurking,"​ and a lot to recommend it. If you go to Classroom 2.0 or some other site, that doesn'​t mean you have to become a contributor right away. If you've spent years evaluating students on their writing, it can be a little scary to put up something you have written for the whole world to see--especially if you don't have hours and hours to refine it. So wait and watch a little. +
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-* Participate. After some purposeful lurking, consider becoming personally engaged. Be brave. Post a comment, or reply to a thought. It can be short! While Web 2.0 may seem short on grammar, spelling, and punctuation,​ your skills in those areas will help you to communicate well, and you will discover that contributing and creating take on significant meaning when you are participating in a worthwhile discussion. +
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-* Digest This Thought: The Answer to Information Overload Is to Produce More Information. +
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-* Teach Content Production. When you have understood the previous suggestion, you'll realize the importance of starting to teach content production to your students. This is important on many levels, not the least of which is teaching how to make decisions about sharing what you produce (copyright issues, and be sure to learn about Creative Commons licensing)--so that your students can appreciate the importance of respecting the licensing rights of others. +
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-* Make Education a Public Discussion. Maybe the general public hasn't spent much time discussing or debating education and learning lately, but it's about time for that to change.+
  
-* Help Build the New Playbook. You may think that you don't have anything to teach the generation of students who seem so tech-savvy, but they really, really need you. For centuries we have had to teach students how to seek out information – now we have to teach them how to sort from an overabundance of information. We've spent the last ten years teaching students how to protect themselves from inappropriate content – now we have to teach them to create appropriate content. They may be "​digital natives,"​ but their knowledge is surface level, and they desperately need training in real thinking skills. More than any other generation, they live lives that are largely separated from the adults around them, talking and texting on cell phones, and connecting online. We may be afraid to enter that world, but enter it we must, for they often swim in uncharted waters without the benefit of adult guidance. To do so we may need to change our conceptions of teaching, and better now than later. 
  
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