Unterschiede

Hier werden die Unterschiede zwischen zwei Versionen angezeigt.

Link zu dieser Vergleichsansicht

aegypten [2011/07/25 15:56] (aktuell)
Zeile 1: Zeile 1:
 +====== Ägypten ======
 +
 +===== Demokratietheoretische Perspektive =====
 +
 +==== The role of Media in Revolution and Question of Democratic change - Case study of Iran´s green movement and Egypt´s Revolution ====
 +
 +  ​
 +
 +{{:​twitter.jpg|}}
 +
 +"A few days after the fall of Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, a Jordanian newspaper printed a joke apparently doing the rounds in Egypt: "Why do the Tunisian youth '​demonstrate'​ in the streets, don't they have Facebook?​."​
 +
 +=== Abstract ===
 +
 +If our assumption based on Merkel´s concept of defective democracy, Iran and Egypt´s regimes are neither liberal democracies nor authoritarian. This theory includes this fact that defective democracy can exist under significant violations of human rights, massive corruption, and a weak rule of law. 
 +There are some similarities between political and socioeconomic situation in Iran and Egypt such as high percentage of corruption and rate of poverty (Table A) which could take into consideration as causes of uprising in both countries. Apart from these mentioned similarities there are some crucial sociopolitical differences between two countries, such as more open social and political spaces in Egypt. This illustrates the fact that even among defective democracy regimes there are “more defective” and “less defective” democracies. This idea could help us to discover why the rise of Internet democracy in Iran´s green movement 2009 was defeated and how did use of Internet democracy lead to Egypt’s revolution and regime change.
 +
 +=== Media Ecology ===
 +
 +Analysis of Egypt´s Media ecology shows that the Egyptian uprising include some new elements absent in the Iranian movement, most notably social media and satellite television. The concept of Media ecology refers to the system in which media technologies interact with each other and with other social, cultural and political system. The proliferation of private channel (since 2001) and satellite television (since 2009) caused that international broadcasts offered alternatives to state media for Egyptian viewers during uprising 2011. Whereas according to Iran constitution “Art: 175: The freedom and dissemination of thoughts in the radio and television of the Islamic Republic of Iran must be guaranteed in keeping with the Islamic criteria and best interest of country. The appointment and dismissed of the head of radio and television of Islamic Republic of Iran rests with the Leader. A council consisting of two representatives each of the president, the head of the judiciary branch and the Islamic consultative assembly shall supervise the functioning of this organization.” The Iranian government absolute monopoly on radio and television prohibits the activity of independent broadcaster,​ thus there is no voice other than regime. Also having the satellite is forbidden and Facebook, Youtube and Twitter are censored by regime and access to them only possible with bypassing the filtering.
 +
 +=== Political power of social Media ===
 +
 +Obviously having access to internet is not enough for transformation. No technology can bring the people in the street. There must be great desire to improve society and to transform to democratic change. Focus on amount of young generation as a user of Twitter and Facebook playing vital role in pro-democracy movement in Egypt and Iran. One-third of Iran and Egypt´s population are young people (Table A) that usually have not been taken into consideration neither by regime nor by opposition. For instance high rate of unemployment of young educated people was one of the uprising reasons in Egypt. The point is Egyptian youth understood how to use Internet to conduct the movement. Even they established a “youth branch of Muslim brotherhood” that they acted more creative and independent from old opposition of Muslim brotherhood. They have developed ways of using online protest for real political movement. In contrast in green movement young generation followed the voice of old political opposition. In addition the Iranian anti-regime ignoring the fact that Iranian society has been deeply polarized and pro-government demonstrators used Internet for propaganda and were/are active in Facebook as well. Therefore the Internet did not lead to revolution or even other political transformation in Iran.
 +In addition to more orgonized use of social media in Egypt by new generation perhaps most notably, international broadcast such as AL-JAZEERA played a significant role to bring Egypt into forefront of world´s attention specifically America and this event led to protection of USA to remove Mubarak´s regime control and censors on Twitter and Facebook.
 +
 +**Table A. Middle east unrest
 +**
 +
 +Country --  a. Unrest index -- b.Corupption-- ​ c.Poverty -- d.Age --   ​g.Literacy
 +
 +Egypt  : a.  (67.6) ​  ​_ ​  b. (  98 )     ​_ ​ c.  (16.7) ​ _  d.(24 )  _   ​g.(66)
 +
 +Iran   : a.( N/A )    _    b.  (146 )    _  c. (  18  )  _ d.(26.3 )  _ g.(82) ((Shoe-Thrower'​s Index from the Economist, Transparency International 2010 corruption index (higher number = greater corruption),​ World Bank, CIA World Face book, UN))
 +
 +
 +=== Conclusion ===
 +
 +Social media allows outspread citizens come together and collaborate more effectivly.Although Egypt´s revolution has not guaranteed the democratic change, at least it has proved the potential of Internet and mass media in various type of transformation. ​   ​
 +Apart from this fact that during the third wave of democratization many dictatorship and authoritarian models of governance have changed to democratic regime but it seems the vague model of Islamic state is more like a puzzle to solve. this is a fact that not all of transformation include transition to democracy in definition of liberal democracy or democracy change. Consequently every political concept should be studied in the context of its specific conditions. With minimum condition of democracy, democratic change could not happen even if revolution through the power of social Media happen.
 +
 +
 +{{:​egypt.jpg|}}
 +
 +Egypt’s revolution: Young generation conducted the demonstrations
 +
 +
 +
 +{{:​my_iran.jpg|}}
 +
 +Iran´s green movement: Young generation congregated around regime opposition.
 +
 +
 +
 +===== Postkoloniale Perspektive =====
 +
 +==== Ägyptische Medien ====
 +Die Grundlage für diese Ausarbeitung ist eine Analyse ägyptischer sowie westlicher neuer (Blogs, Twitter) und alter Medien (Zeitungen, TV) mit dem Ziel, einen Eindruck über die Darstellung der Revolution in Ägypten im Frühjahr 2011 zu bekommen. ​
 +Es folgen (1) eine zusammenfassende **Darstellung des „Westens“** aus Sicht ägyptischer Medien und daran anschließend (2) eine **Darstellung der eigenen Revolution** innerhalb der ägyptischen Medien.
 +
 +=== (1) Die Repräsentation des "​Westens"​ ===
 +Bezüglich der wirtschaftlichen Interessen des Westens wird oftmals davon ausgegangen,​ dass der „Westen“ seinen Einfluss ausbauen will, da in vielen Blogs zu lesen ist, dass finanzielle Hilfe an wirtschaftliche Investitionsmöglichkeiten gebunden sei (Hanieh 2011: 2). Dies impliziert, dass der Westen gegen die Revolution arbeitet – die proklamierte Schulden-Befreiung Ägyptens sei in Realität eine an Konditionen gekoppelte Schulden-Anhäufung. Das Ziel des Westens sei es, Kontrolle darüber zu bekommen, wie und wo das Geld eingesetzt wird, eine Veränderung zu früherer neoliberaler Politik ist daher nicht zu erkennen (ebd.).
 +Bei Betrachtung der Politik des Westens gegenüber Ägypten überwiegen nüchterne Darstellungen in Blogs (Elyan 2011: 1), die dem Westen Erpressungsversuche und anti-demokratische Züge unterstellen (Hanieh 2011: 3). Eine Intervention mit erneuter Kolonialisierung wird prophezeit. Zudem wird der Begriff „Demokratie“ häufig diskutiert; es ist allerdings keine übereinstimmende begriffliche Definition identifizierbar (Borkan 2011: 2). Das von Hall beschriebene „othering“ zwischen „dem Westen“ und Ägypten ist in diesem Kontext zu erkennen und lässt sich in den ägyptischen Medien erkennen.
 +
 +===(2) Die Revolution in den ägyptischen Medien ====
 +Die **ägyptische Darstellung der eigenen Revolution** im Frühjahr 2011 ist sehr positiv. Es finden sich vermehrt Interpretationen,​ die die Stärke und Legitimität der Revolution in der Masseninitiative und Partizipation sehen (Ezzat 2011: 1). So wird die Revolution im Allgemeinen als ein Abenteuer mit dem Ziel Freiheit beschrieben;​ auch die Unruhen, die mit ihr einhergehen,​ sind daher normale Vorgänge, die für die Herstellung von Sicherheit und Stabilität erforderlich sind (ebd.: 2). 
 +Als negativ in der ägyptischen Berichterstattung wird allerdings die Abspaltung zwischen verschiedenen Klassen der Gesellschaft beurteilt. Dies wird in Zeitungsartikeln deutlich, die die Passivität der oberen und mittleren Klassen in Bezug auf die Brutalität der Polizei gegenüber unteren Schichten beschreiben (ebd.: 1). Den Jugendlichen wird hierbei die Rolle der Sündenböcke und Verbrecher zugeteilt, die die bereits gewonnene Stabilität gefährden. Ein teilweise sehr explizites „othering“ ist in diesem Zusammenhang zwischen Polizei/​Militär und Demonstranten zu identifizieren. ​
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +==== Westliche Medien ====
 +Die Grundlage für diesen Teil ist eine Analyse westlicher neuer (Blogs, Twitter) und alter Medien (Zeitungen, TV) mit dem Ziel, einen Eindruck über die Darstellung der Revolution in Ägypten im Frühjahr 2011 zu bekommen. ​
 +Es folgen (1) eine zusammenfassende Darstellung der ägyptischen Revolution in westlichen Medien sowie (2) eine Darstellung der Rolle des „Westens“ aus Sicht westlicher Medien.
 + 
 +=== (1) Darstellung der ägyptischen Revolution im Frühjahr 2011 ===
 +In der sehr unterschiedlichen Darstellung der ägyptischen Revolution in verschiedenen westlichen Medien ist als Gemeinsamkeit die insgesamt negative Berichterstattung über fortlaufende Menschenrechtsverletzungen zu erkennen. Dabei wird in den teils sehr abwertenden Berichte argumentiert,​ dass die Unruhen in Ägypten erwartet worden seien und dass es sich um eine prophezeibare Revolution handele (Leick 2011: 138). Es wird weiter ausgeführt,​ dass die schnelle Zunahme der Alphabetisierung,​ insbesondere von Frauen, die abnehmende Geburtenrate und der Rückgang des Brauchs der Endogamie zu einer kulturellen und mentalen Modernisierung geführt haben (ebd.). In diesem Zusammenhang wird das von Hall beschriebene „othering“ deutlich, da die Auswertung der Revolution von oben herab geschieht, wobei die Unruhen mithilfe einer Addierung der Umstände in Ägypten beinahe rational erklärt werden, d.h. die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Revolution wird „errechnet“.
 +Auch kann man im Allgemeinen eine positive und wenig reflektierte Darstellung der Unterstützung des Westens in den Medien erkennen. Diese sei von den Aufständischen erwünscht, da „sie“ auf die Unterstützung des Westens angewiesen seien und es wird in Frage gestellt, ob der Nahe Osten überhaupt ohne westliche Hilfe kann (Smoltczy 2011: 91).
 +Bezüglich der Rolle von Frauen während der ägyptischen Revolution erfolgt hier zumeist eine positive Berichterstattung,​ die häufig zu der Schlussfolgerung kommt, dass eine Emanzipation der Frau stattfindet (Leick 2011: 141). Hierbei wird allerdings deutlich, dass es in den westlichen Medien – in direktem Kontrast zu den ägyptischen – zu verspäteten Berichten über Vergehen und Folter gegenüber Frauen kommt. Insbesondere die sogenannten „Jungfräulichkeitstests“,​ denen weibliche Demonstranten unterzogen wurden, werden in sehr reißerischer Art dargestellt und die Berichte zeichnen sich durch eine sehr subjektive Herangehensweise aus (Shafy 2011: 103). Die skeptische, dennoch heldenhafte Darstellung der Frauen auf dem Tahir Platz macht deutlich, dass die sonst als „passiv“ beschriebene Rolle von Frauen einer Veränderung unterläuft,​ die nach einer Analyse westlicher Medien festzustellen ist. Das Erstaunen über ägyptische Frauen, die eine eigene Meinung haben und sich für ihr Land einsetzen wird mithilfe des bereits genannten Konzepts von Hall („othering“) verdeutlicht. ​  
 +Insgesamt ist es auffällig, dass nur die Wertung „westlicher“ Institutionen und Organisationen (Amnesty International,​ Europäisches Parlament) in den Medien zitiert werden, um die fortlaufenden Menschenrechtsverletzungen in Ägypten zu verurteilen (ebd. 103). Diese teils sehr einseitigen Interpretationen kommen oft zu dem Schluss, dass die ägyptische Armee die Bewegungsfreiheit des Volkes kontrollieren will und sich weiterhin auf das alte System stützt. Das schlechte Bild des Militärs in westlichen Medien kann daher erneut als Beispiel für Halls „othering“ gesehen werden, da dieses als verständnislos und rückständig dargestellt wird.
 +
 +
 +=== (2) Darstellung der Rolle des „Westens“ während der ägyptischen Revolution ===
 +Die Rolle des Westens in den eigenen Medien enthält oftmals eine Kritik an den wirtschaftlichen Beziehungen zwischen der EU und den früheren Despoten (Neubacher 2011: 74). Hierbei ist allerdings auffällig, dass kaum eine Darstellung zu einem reflektierten Ergebnis kommt, das Verbesserungsvorschläge oder andere Maßnahmen für die Zukunft enthält, die solch ein Verhalten vermeiden würden. Ziel der Politik des Westens gegenüber Ägypten war und ist es für Stabilität zu sorgen und den Ölmarkt zu sichern (Zand 2011: 80). 
 +Die westlichen Medien benutzen dabei oftmals eine Darstellung von „der arabischen Welt“ (ebd. 81). Dieses führt zu Verallgemeinerungen,​ so dass die Region z.B. teilweise weitestgehend als unproduktiv beschrieben wird oder ihr ein fahrlässiger Umgang mit den eigenen Ressourcen unterstellt wird. Daher ist auch hier das „othering“ von Hall erkennbar, das eine unreflektierte Darstellung impliziert, die alle Staaten als ein Land darstellt. ​
 +In diesem Zusammenhang ist auch die Darstellung der ägyptischen Gesellschaft in westlichen Medien zu nennen. Die Betitelung einer „nicht durchorganisierten Gesellschaft“ (ebd. 84), die einer Umerziehung bedarf macht deutlich, dass eine Halls’sche Interpretation auch hier hilft zu erkennen, dass diese „Umerziehung“ von Seiten des Westens geschehen sollte. ​
 +Allgemein ist jedoch eine Übereinstimmung erkennbar, dass die Revolutionen den arabischen Völkern gehören, und dass der „Westen“ gut beraten sei, das zu respektieren (ebd. 83). Nur bezüglich der wirtschaftlichen Probleme Ägyptens häufen sich Darstellungen,​ die einen „Marshall-Plan“ fordern, der die klaffenden Wohlstandslücken schließen kann (ebd. 87). Hier wird deutlich, dass dem Westen die Rolle des Heilsbringers zugedacht wird, der die Ägypter aus ihrer Situation befreit. Exemplarisch hierfür sind die wiederholten Beschreibungen der US-amerikanischen Propellermaschinen,​ die im Überfluggebiet Internet- und Handyzugang für die ägyptische Bevölkerung bringen (Spiegel 5.03.2011: 76). Mithilfe Halls Konzepts lässt sich daher eine Unmündigkeit erkennen, die den Ägyptern seitens der westlichen Medien unterstellt wird und die nur durch finanzielle Unterstützung des Westens überwunden werden kann. 
 +
 +==== Quellenverzeichnis ====
 +AlMasry AlYoum, Ezzat, Amr: „Are we still Khaled Saeed?“ 7.06.2011 (http://​www.almasryalyoum.com/​en/​node/​465738). ​
 +
 +Jadaliyya Blog, Hanieh, Adam: „Egypt’s „Orderly Transition“?​ International Aid and the Rush to Structural Adjustment“ 29.05.2011 (http://​www.jadaliyya.com/​pages/​index/​1711/​egypt%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%98orderly-transition%E2%80%99-international-aid-and).
 +
 +Spiegel: „Fliegendes Netz“ Nr. 10, 5.03.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel: „Ikonen des Aufstands“ Nr. 23, 6.06.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel, Bednarz, Dieter: „Der Schatz des Pharao“ Nr. 21, 23.05.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel, Ehlers, Fiona: „Die Jungfrauen vom Tahir“ Nr. 23, 6.06.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel, Leick, Romain: „Al-Qaida war schon tot“ Nr. 20, 16.05.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel, Neubacher, Alexander: „Schrille Reserven“ Nr. 20, 16.05.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel, Smoltczyk, Alexander: „Arabischer Sommer“ Nr. 20, 16.05.2011.
 +
 +Spiegel, Zand, Bernhard: „Treibhaus der Weltpolitik“ Nr. 10, 5.03.2011.
 +
 +The Daily News Egypt, Abdellatif, Reem: „US business delegation eyes investments in post-Mubarak Egypt“ 6.06.2011 (http://​www.thedailynewsegypt.com/​economy/​us-business-delegation-eyes-investments-in-post-mubarak-egypt.html#​). ​
 +
 +The Daily News Egypt, Al Malky, Rania: „Human rights, not rocket science“ 10.06.2011 (http://​www.thedailynewsegypt.com/​editorial/​human-rights-not-rocket-science.html#​). ​
 +
 +The Daily News Egypt, Borkan, Brett: „US military chief reaffirms support for Egypt army, evades question on military trials“ 8.06.2011 (http://​www.thedailynewsegypt.com/​egypt/​us-military-chief-reaffirms-support-for-egypt-army-evades-question-on-military-trials.html#​). ​
 +
 +The Daily News Egypt, Elyan, Tamim: „US embassy pressured Egypt on nuclear tender, says leaked cable“ 2.06.2011 (http://​www.thedailynewsegypt.com/​egypt/​us-embassy-pressured-egypt-on-nuclear-tender-says-leaked-cable.html#​).
 +
 +The Economist: „Egypt’s Revolution – Staggering in the right direction“ 14.04.11 (http://​www.economist.com/​node/​18561813). ​
 +
 +The Economist: „Arab Spring – Who lost Egypt?“ 1.03.11 (http://​www.economist.com/​blogs/​democracyinamerica/​2011/​03/​arab_spring). ​
 +
 +The Egypt Blog, Schauki, Mamduh: „Mubarak leave us now!“ 5.02.2011 (http://​theegyptblog.blogspot.com/#​abt).
 +
 +The New York Times, Friedman, Thomas: „Pay Attention“ 28.05.11 (http://​www.nytimes.com/​2011/​05/​29/​opinion/​29friedmanOpEd.html?​ref=egypt). ​
 +
 +The New York Times, Kirkpatrick,​ David: „Egypt’s Military Censors Critics as it Faces More Scrutiny“ 31.05.11 (http://​www.nytimes.com/​2011/​06/​01/​world/​middleeast/​01egypt.html?​ref=egypt).
  
Drucken/exportieren